The Guardian Guide - New exhibitions 22 February 2012

Robert Clark

Laura Aldridge has described her work as "expanded collage". If a predominant stream of 20th-century art consisted of fragments of disparate images, Aldridge has artistic fun disassembling and even seemingly exploding her hand-crafted elements across gallery floors and walls. She recognises that the inanimate objects we use most intimately can replicate our bodily gestures. A crowd of oversized fabric pockets, made of cotton or denim, occupy the walls here like a theatrical lineup of puppetry wombs. Elsewhere, a series of fabric tubes, stuffed with solidified plaster, writhe like intestinal rag dolls. It's as if some slightly unhinged adult with an overactive sense of fun had been let loose in a playroom.

Centre For Contemporary Art, to 3 Mar

The Guardian Guide - New exhibitions 22 February 2012

Robert Clark

Laura Aldridge has described her work as "expanded collage". If a predominant stream of 20th-century art consisted of fragments of disparate images, Aldridge has artistic fun disassembling and even seemingly exploding her hand-crafted elements across gallery floors and walls. She recognises that the inanimate objects we use most intimately can replicate our bodily gestures. A crowd of oversized fabric pockets, made of cotton or denim, occupy the walls here like a theatrical lineup of puppetry wombs. Elsewhere, a series of fabric tubes, stuffed with solidified plaster, writhe like intestinal rag dolls. It's as if some slightly unhinged adult with an overactive sense of fun had been let loose in a playroom.

Centre For Contemporary Art, to 3 Mar